A Pacific Northwest Premiere at Readers Theatre Repertory

Spring sees the traditional return of Pacific Northwest original theatre to RTR with The Bogeyman, by David Ritchie, directed by Bob Martin.

The play, a tale of fathers and sons, mothers and daughters, golf and Napoleon, is Ritchie’s second story to be told by the company. His first focused on the “Pig War,” a protracted battle fought in 1859 in the San Juan Islands. This tale picks up generations later, taking us to a golf course in Scotland. “This story is linked to the first in funny and fascinating ways,” says Martin. “The playwright extends his themes and best of all, brings back a particularly colorful character from the first.”

The cast includes David Brown, Zeina Hamady, Robert Projansky. Sarah Dresser, George Fosgate, Rick Sanders and Marvin Gray

For its season finale on May 10-11, RTR takes us to Ireland with another original to America: plays by newly-rediscovered Irish playwright Teresa Deevy, directed by Mary McDonald-Lewis. Writing at the time of Lady Gregory, Deevy examines the lives of strong Irish women and the men who both love… and hate them. Deevy’s work is now center stage on Broadway, playing to rave reviews, and can’t be found on stage anywhere else in the United States. RTR will also stage several Deevy plays in its 14th season. More on this luminous, forgotten playwright can be found at http://vimeo.com/album/1644083

Author’s Note:

Very good players, those who were entirely equal to a golf course’s difficulties were in the nineteenth century said to have achieved “the ground score.” Now they’d “make par” or “play off scratch.” “Par” came from stock market jargon, meaning “equal.” “Bogey” came from Scots for “evil spirit” (bogle), or “Boney” (Napoleon), the first “bogeyman” in British minds. Thinking of a music hall song, “Hush, Hush, Here Comes the Bogey Man,” after a round in 1890 Major Wellman dubbed his golfing opponent, “a regular bogeyman.” Thereafter many fine golfers were called “bogeymen.” “Colonel Bogey,” a tune made famous by the movie, “The Bridge Over the River Kwai,” refers to an imaginary golfer of that era. Everything changes; today a “bogey golfer” takes eighteen strokes more than par.

Greg Alexander as Colin, Rick Sanders as Malcolm, Sarah Dresser as Cleaning Lady

Greg Alexander as Colin, Rick Sanders as Malcolm, Sarah Dresser as Cleaning Lady

Greg Alexander as Colin, Rick Sanders as Malcolm, Sarah Dresser as Cleaning Lady, Marvin Gray as the Captain, George Fosgate as Glisan, and Robert Projansky as Sanderson

Greg Alexander as Colin, Rick Sanders as Malcolm, Sarah Dresser as Cleaning Lady, Marvin Gray as the Captain, George Fosgate as Glisan, and Robert Projansky as Sanderson

Greg Alexander as Colin, Marvin Gray as The Captain, Rick Sanders as Malcolm, Sarah Dresser as Cleaning Lady, George Fosgate as Glisan, and Robert Projansky as Sanderson

Greg Alexander as Colin, Marvin Gray as The Captain, Rick Sanders as Malcolm, Sarah Dresser as Cleaning Lady, George Fosgate as Glisan, and Robert Projansky as Sanderson

Rick Sanders as Malcolm, Greg Alexander as Colin,  Zeina Hamady as Jenkinson,  Marvin Gray as The Captain, and George Fosgate as Glisan, and

Rick Sanders as Malcolm, Greg Alexander as Colin, Zeina Hamady as Jenkinson, Marvin Gray as The Captain, and George Fosgate as Glisan

Greg Alexander as Colin, Marvin Gray as The Captain, Rick Sanders as Malcolm, Zeina Hamady as Jenkinson, George Fosgate as Glisan, Robert Projansky as Sanderson, and Sarah Dresser as The Cleaning Lady

Greg Alexander as Colin, Marvin Gray as The Captain, Rick Sanders as Malcolm, Zeina Hamady as Jenkinson, George Fosgate as Glisan, Robert Projansky as Sanderson, and Sarah Dresser as The Cleaning Lady

See the full Album on our Facebook page

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s